Thursday, May 5, 2011

Cultivating the Land of Mind

From U Jotika, a very wise Theravada teacher, some pointers on how to prepare the mind for mindfulness practice:

Before we meditate there are few things we need to reflect on in order to prepare our mind. In our daily life we get dis- tracted by so many things . . .

'When we understand that life is short and time is precious and if we will have developed some understanding of the Dhamma, it becomes more precious. Do not procrastinate, do what should be done today, we don’t know whether we will be still alive tomorrow. Today, now, do what should be done, try to accomplish, to do.' . . . 

An earnest meditator doesn’t procrastinate. No matter where you are or what you are doing; that is the time and the place to meditate . . .

When we take Buddha as a teacher, His purity, wisdom and freedom gives us a direction, “Where am I going, what is my goal”? . . . 

When you’ve really seen that meditation is worthwhile you’ll give your life to it. The more you give, the more you get. Do it with all your heart! . . .

Freedom really means knowing what is useful, what is beneficial and worthwhile, knowing what is wholesome and what is unwholesome and choosing what is wholesome, good and right and doing it whole heartedly . . . 

When we don’t keep the five precepts we harm others as well as ourselves. These precepts are not imposed by somebody. It is nature . . .

Let go of the past and be willing to fully live in the present. Be willing to change and to grow. Often we are afraid to change, to grow, and because of lack of confidence we don’t try our best. We are responsible for ourselves and our lives, no matter what happened in the past, without blaming anybody . .  .

It is a natural thing for every being to experience good and bad things in life, reflecting on this it helps to let go, to not get attached . . . 

Meditation is like cultivating the land. Look very deep into your mind every day, and try to weed, because every day seeds are coming in the mind. They will take root and if you let them stay there long, their roots will become very strong and it will be harder for you to root them out, but if you can throw away the seed before it germinates it will be very helpful . . . 

It is up to me, up to you.

Now, may you enjoy this day, cultivating mindfulness.

2 comments:

  1. Sometimes thoughts and ideas, although familiar, are phrased in another way that just seem to 'go in more' - I found that with your seed and weed analogy. Thanks :)

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  2. I am glad!

    May you pull out the young weeds, fast! And may you recognize those that have grown unnoticed, and may you uproot them!

    You and I both, and hopefully many more on the path, all cultivating, tending the fertile soil of our minds.

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